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  • Writer's pictureHeather Yeoman

Florida FAQ Flood Zones Explained

Florida Flood Zones Explained

Recently, several of my clients have asked about flood zones and what the codes actually mean. I thought I'd share some information to give a brief explanation. Of note, every property in Florida will have a flood zone rating meaning this is relevant to any buyer in the state.

Florida flood zones are areas in the state of Florida that are designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) based on the likelihood of flooding occurring in those areas. These zones are divided into different categories, or flood zones, based on the level of risk associated with each area.

The flood zones in Florida are classified into four main categories:

1. Zone X - Areas outside the 0.2% annual chance floodplain or areas of minimal flooding. - Does not require flood insurance

2. Zone A - Areas with a 1% annual chance of flooding and a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year mortgage.

3. Zone AE - Areas with a 1% annual chance of flooding and a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year mortgage. These areas also have a base flood elevation determined by detailed analysis.

4. Zone VE - Areas with a 1% annual chance of flooding and a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year mortgage. These areas also have a high-velocity hazard associated with wave action.

In general, the higher the flood zone category, the greater the likelihood of flooding and the more stringent the building and insurance requirements become. For example, properties in Zones A, AE, and VE typically require flood insurance if there is a mortgage on the property. Properties located in Zone X do not require flood insurance, but it is still recommended.

It's important to note that flood zones can change over time due to changes in weather patterns, changes in the built environment, or other factors. It's always a good idea to check the latest flood zone maps and consult with local authorities to determine the flood risk associated with a particular property.




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